Security

The US Air Force Academy Assembly

Convened annually since 1959, the Academy Assembly is an undergraduate-led conference held by the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) and co-sponsored with The American Assembly. Cadets help organize and take part in a 3-day discussion of a major theme in American foreign policy, in dialog with academic experts and government officials.

U.S. Interests in the 1990s

A four-year project on U.S. international security policies and challenges. The project included Assemblies on Preserving the Global Environment, Rethinking America's Security, After the Soviet Union, and Public Engagement in U.S. Foreign Policy.

The Next Generation Project: U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions

The Next Generation Project built capacity among the next generation of US leadership to address the challenges of globalization and the changing role of the United States in world affairs. Between 2006 and 2008, through a program of fellowships and workshops, the Next Generation Project built a network of 300 fellows from a wide range of fields and communities.

Drones & Aerial Robotics Conference

The Assembly organized a track on the policy implications of increasing drone use at the October 2013 Drones & Aerial Robotics Conference, focused on public safety and the emerging jurisdictional issues as local and federal agencies apportion the newly-used airspaces between street and sky.

55th U.S. Air Force Academy Assembly

US India Relations: Partners in Democracy

54th U.S. Air Force Academy Assembly

US-China Relations: Conflict or Cooperation in the 21st Century.

U.S. Foreign Policy and the United Nations System

1995
The report from the 1995 Assembly of this name describes breakdown of bipartisan approaches to US involvement with the UN system and calls for a recommitment of the parties to a politically sustainable and consistent strategy of engagement.

After the Soviet Union: Implications for U.S. Policy

1992

 

After the collapse of the Soviet system, the United States was presented with the opportunity of a political and military shift  in the heartland of Eurasia.  This 1992 meeting and report sought to discuss the potential of filling that void the Soviet states left behind, while taking into account the economic collapse and ethnic tension that threatened the stability of the region. Participants in this Assembly focused on the concepts of partnership and leadership with a multilateral outlook.

Rethinking America's Security: Beyond Cold War to New World Order

1992. Graham Allison (ed.), Gregory F. Treverton (ed.)
 
 

During the Cold War, American national security seemed clearly defined: to protect against the overarching threat of the Soviet Union and Communist expansion.  But with the demise of Communism, America must reconsider its role in the world as dramatically as it did after victory in World War II.

 

Rethinking America's Security

1991

During the Cold War, American national security seemed clearly defined:  to protect against the overarching threat of the Soviet Union and Communist expansion.  With the demise of Communism, America was forced to reconsider its role in the world as dramatically as it did after victory in World War II.  The report from this Assembly calls for greater roles for Germany and Japan in multilateral actions and encourages regional bodies to strengthen their peace keeping machinery.

The American Assembly
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